Parsons House

A Connecticut River Valley Doorway

In June 2010 I was asked by the  owner/ contractor of the Noah Parsons  House  reconstruction project to create a new entry for this historic building.

The Noah Parsons house, originally built in 1755 in Northampton, Massachusetts, was disassembled in 2003 and taken to New Hampshire to be rebuilt. That project was never started. The Noah Parsons house is being rebuilt to a high degree of authenticity while meeting current building codes in all aspects.

John B. Otis, a restoration contractor from Goshen, Massachusetts,was contacted by the then owner of the Parsons house and ended up purchasing it. He is currently rebuilding it  in Williamsburg, Massachusetts, on Village Hill Rd.
There was no documentation for the original entry of the Noah Parsons house. I  designed  an interpreted entry using  field measurements taken at Historic Deerfield, as well as data in the book,

Connecticut River Valley Doorways: An Eighteenth-Century Flowering, by Amelia F. Miller

The available space indicated that a Flat-Top Doorway was needed to achieve proper proportions on  the front  elevation.

This doorway is built of Eastern White Pine with a White Oak threshold. Reproduction Bulls-eye glass  is from Blenko Glass Co. The unit is weather stripped to contemporary standards using high quality silicone seals from Conservation Technology. Hardware is a mix of authentic period pieces and hand forged reproductions. It is, I think, an attractive element that ties in nicely to this historic home.

 

  • Parson History

    In June 2010 I was asked by the owner/ contractor of the Noah Parsons House reconstruction project, to create a new entry for this historic building.

  • The Noah Parsons house

    The Noah Parsons house is being rebuilt to a high degree of authenticity while meeting current building codes in all aspects.

  • Conneticut River Valley entry

    A reproduction entry built of White pine with hand blown Bullseye glass.

  • Upper door section

    Hand blown Bullseyes were very irregular.